Saturday Morning Market Finds

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Tiger Eye Dried Beans

 

Welcome back to Vegan Mami’s Good Food Kitchen! Saturday morning I enjoyed a shopping trip to my local Farmer’s Market. I’ve always enjoyed the atmosphere of the market filled with like-minded shoppers, who crowd in around the different tables and displays offered by the farmers and  venders. Customers are generously plied with samples and antidotes about items for sale. The venders are talkative and happy to answer any and all questions about their businesses. And there is a general sense of community among everyone, and a sense of relaxation and enjoyment, as people visit with one another sharing their hauls and munching on an appetizing treat or two, maybe accompanied by a steaming cup of coffee or tea. They also crowd around  and enjoy the audible art of the performers, who are more likely than not, local musicians.

Today I purchased potatoes,  dried beans and bok choy. The bok choy, which I purchased from Heron Pond Farm, from South Hampton N.H., was on the smallish side (baby bok choy), and its leaves were dark green and gloriously generous. I could just imagine seeing them swimming luxuriously in a brothy bowl of soup!

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Bok Choi

The dried beans, from The Root Seller located in Nottingham NH, were just lovely, and I was excited about trying them. I chose Tiger Eye, Flageolet, Jacob’s Cattle, Cranberry and Arikara Yellow. As soon as I returned home I set about soaking the tiger eye variety, to see how those cooked up and tasted.

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Bean Haul

 

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Tiger Eyes Soaking in Water

I boiled the Tiger Eye beans with 1/2 onion, one bay leaf and one smashed garlic clove and them cooked until tender. The beans were nice with a mild flavor and a texture similar to chickpeas (garbanzo beans). I cooked them a bit longer  to see if they would become creamy, but they still retained a small bite and seemed to begin breaking apart. Seems like they would be a versatile bean, working well in soups and stews and definitely standing on there own as a solo plate of beans. They would also puree well and make a nice bean dip or spread, in the same way chickpeas can be made into hummus.

I also purchased two five pound bags of potatoes from Riverside Farm Stand and Greenhouse  from Berwick Maine. I chose Yukon Gold Gem, and Rose Gold. I know from past experiences, my husband and I enjoy the Yukon Gold as an all purpose potato; using it for oven fries, mashed potatoes, in soups and stews, and baked potatoes. The Rose Gold, we had never tried before, and I thought it would be interesting to see what the difference could be.

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Spuds!

I cooked one potato of each kind in a saucepan filled with cold water, bought to the boil and then cooked over medium heat until the potatoes were tender. I cooked them this way, because I wanted them as unadorned as possible, even using no salt, to taste them just as they are with no condiments whatsoever. I wanted their individual flavors and textures to shine through.

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Potato Taste Test

The Yukon Gold Gem cooked up as I had expected, but it was not as gold as others we have had, and it seemed to share a bit of the floury texture of a russet potato. But it was definitely a waxy potato with very thin skin, which could easily be left on for cooking and eating.It was mildly sweet, with a rounded almost nutty, potato flavor.

And then came the Rose Gold! Wow! What a surprise! A waxy texture with no floury consistency whatsoever. The color was definitely a lovely rose gold hue, and the skin was also thin and suitable for leaving on the potato, if desired. The flavor was creamy and sweet and needed no embellishment at all. I imagined steaming them and having them with a salad; either cubed and tossed on top, or sliced and served on the side. I could imagine preparing these potatoes in any way imaginable and they would only improve the recipe. A new favorite, without a doubt!

All in all, it was a good, enjoyable trip to the Farmer’s Market. Even though it was not a good day for finding moneysaving values, I did find  items, that are local and of the highest quality as compared to what I would find in the chain grocery stores. My shopping haul total came to $31.80 cents. The dried beans were $5.00 a 1lb bag; I purchased 5 bags, which allowed me to get one bag free (special pricing from The Root Seller). The potatoes were $5.00 a 5lb bag, which is an average price for local  potatoes grown in the Seacoast area. The bok choy I chose came to $1.80 and I was very happy with that purchase.

Thank you for visiting Mami’s Good Food Kitchen today, and letting me share with you my market finds. Remember to feed yourself and your loved ones good, honest food. Eat as unprocessed as possible, as local as possible and always try new things!

Eat like it matters- because it really does!

Potato and White Bean Cakes

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Potato and White Bean Cake with catsup and white kimchi

Welcome to Mami’s Good Food Kitchen! I will jump right into sharing this recipe in the spirit it was created. When I woke up this morning, I knew what I needed to do. It would be simple and quick with a minimum of fuss but a maximum of flavor. No added oils or sugars and no dairy products. Not a sweet recipe, but a savory recipe; suitable for breakfast or snack, or really any meal at all.

So, here it is!

Potato and White Bean Cake

  • Preheat oven to 425 F
  • Gather Ingredients:
  • 1/4 cup sundried tomatoes soaked in 1/2 cup hot water
  • 10 oz. cooked potato (1 medium and 1 small)
  • 3/4 cup cooked white beans, drained and rinsed (canned is fine)
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 small onion, minced
  • 2 Tbsp dried parsley
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp nutritional yeast
  • sprinkle of cayenne pepper (to add just a spark of heat)
  • 3 Tbsp of the sundried tomato soaking water
  • ground black pepper, to taste
  • salt to taste (if you cook no salt, then omit the salt)
  • panko crumbs or bread crumbs

Use cooked potatoes. If you have none on hand and want to cook them quickly, use the microwave and put them on the potato setting. If you don’t use a microwave, cut potatoes small and boil or steam until soft, while getting the rest of the ingredients together.

Then put 1/4 cup, no oil, sun dried tomatoes in a small bowl and pour 1/2 cup hot water over them to rehydrate. Let soak while you collect rest of ingredients.

In medium sized bowl, put 3/4 cup drained, white beans and mash gently with a fork, leaving most in their whole bean shape. Add to this the crushed garlic, minced onion, dried parsley, nutritional yeast, cayenne pepper, ground black pepper and salt, if you are using salt.

Drain sundried tomatoes, saving the liquid, and mince, or chop fine the reconstituted tomato, and add to the bowl. When the potatoes have cooled off enough to handle, mash them lightly and add the potatoes to the bowl. I left the skins on, to add extra fiber to the cakes.

Now mix all ingredients using your hands or a bean masher. A potato masher would work, too, but don’t mash too much, you still want texture, in your potato cake. Add the three tablespoons of the (saved) sundried tomato water and mix into potato bean mixture. You will be able to form mixture into patties. Make 5 or 6 patties, depending on the size you would like.

Once formed, you can pat panko bread crumbs on each side of the patty, and place on parchment paper sheet or silpat liner. I place this on top of my pizza stone which has been heating up with the oven. I find this helps me to crisp up the cakes and gives them a pleasing texture.

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4 cakes with 3 fun croquette shapes

Bake them in the oven, 425F for 15 minutes, turn them over and bake another 10 to 15 minutes, keeping watch not to burn, but cooking until golden brown and crispy.

These cakes could be pan fried if you wanted to use a non stick pan.

Use whatever condiment you enjoy and you will be rewarded with a tasty and satisfying base for any meal. I enjoyed them at breakfast with catsup and white kimchi, but I could easily see them being enjoyed covered  with a  tomato sauce and served with a salad, or as a snack with a no-cheese sauce for dipping!

Enjoy!

Remember to feed yourself and your loved ones good food, as unprocessed as possible. Eat like it matters; because it really does!

 

No-Cheese Cheezy Sauce

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No-cheese cheezy sauce turned into nacho cheeze sauce

Welcome  to Vegan Mami’s Good Food Kitchen. This past weekend my grandsons came over to visit, and what a fun visit it was! Both boys are growing so fast and always playing so hard! Along with growing and using up their energy stores they bought with them their ever increasing appetites. One of their very favorite meals is macaroni and cheese. You know the kind, the one that comes in a box and has a very creamy, rich sauce.

Because I don’t have boxes of mac-n-cheese in my pantry or cheese in my refrigerator to make it from scratch, I decided to try a no-cheese sauce for them and see if I could get them to eat it and hopefully enjoy it. The following is the recipe I like to use when I want to make a sauce that is easy to put together, cheezy, versatile and  is healthier than loading cheese and butter into a recipe.

No-Cheese Cheezy Sauce

  • 2 yukon gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 1″ chunks
  • 2 carrot, peeled and chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1 inch piece fresh turmeric, peeled. Or use powdered turmeric, 1/2 tsp.
  • 1 large onion, or 2 small, peeled and chopped into quarters

put all ingredients listed above into a medium saucepan and fill with water until all vegetables are covered. Put pan on burner over high heat until water begins to boil. Turn heat to medium and cook until veggies are fork tender.

With a slotted spoon, put all veggies in a blender, or food processor, with no more than 1/4 cup of cooking liquid. Add 2 Tablespoons nutritional yeast, and 1/2 tsp. ground yellow mustard. Carefully blend veggies until a smooth sauce develops. It will take about 30 to 45 seconds.

At this point you can add more of the cooking water if you think the sauce is too thick. Add salt and white pepper to your taste, and if you want a cheezier flavor, add more nutritional yeast, but only add in 1 tablespoon at a time and taste to see if the flavor is  where you want it. You should have approximately 3 cups.

To make macaroni and no-cheeze, cook your favorite pasta shape and put into a bowl, and spoon a bit of sauce over all and mix well. Very good, and very satisfying. Both boys enjoyed it and asked for seconds.

You can enjoy this sauce as a dip for your oven baked potatoes, and you will have a low fat and low sodium snack or side dish. Or you can ladle the sauce generously over a hot, steamed cauliflower sprinkled with bread crumbs, and enjoy a decadent dish!

Or, you can do as I did this afternoon, and bake your own corn chips by cutting corn tortillas into four wedges, baking them in a 425 degree oven for 12 to 15 minutes, until they become golden brown and toasty. Remove from oven and set on serving plate. Take some leftover No-cheese sauce and stir in some chili powder seasoning, cumin, smoked paprika and a couple shots of your favorite hot sauce, all to your taste. You can add tomato salsa or black olives or chopped green or red onions, depending on what you like and what you have on hand. Mix all together and warm the sauce in microwave or in a pan on the stove. and voila! Your have just made a healthier alternative to Tortilla chips and Nacho Cheese sauce!

Enjoy! Thank you for stopping by, I hope all your meals are tasty, nourishing and healthy  and your heart is filled with love.