Roots Juice Bar: Restaurant Discovery

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Roots Juice Bar, 6 third street, Dover NH

Rushing around doing errands one morning, I realized I hadn’t made time for breakfast and I hadn’t even had my first cup of coffee. I had haphazardly planned to stop for a leisurely cup of coffee at the opposite side of town, but I had forgotten my plan after I finished my errands in that area. I was downtown Dover when I was reminded by my complaining stomach how hungry I was, When I saw a restaurant sign of a place I had always thought about stopping at but never seemed to have the time to explore.

It was a restaurant called Roots Juice Bar, a vegan restaurant offering  fresh juices and smoothies, house brewed kombucha, assorted coffees and teas, breakfast, lunch and nibbles. All offerings were vegan. So I decided right then, this would be a good place to take a moment and catch my breath before continuing on with my busy day.

I parked on the street, finding a parking spot only half a block away. When I opened the door and walked inside, I was greeted by a cozy looking and pristinely clean restaurant with a few tables and a nice comfy decor.20170228_125042 The cashier/ordering counter looked inviting and friendly, as was the pleasant looking associate waiting to take my order.The time was 2pm  and I wasn’t sure if I would be able to get breakfast; but she assured me they provide breakfast menu items anytime during the day. The restaurant hours are 8am to 4pm, monday through saturday. The kitchen area and food prep area were in full view, directly behind the cashier counter.

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Roots Juice Bar, 6 third street, Dover NH

I ordered a Breakfast Bowl, which was made with quinoa, strawberry, raspberry, cranberries, almond butter, cashew cream, fresh mint and chia seeds, priced at $8.00 a bowl. I ordered a cup of organic coffee with coconut whip, for $3.00. I could see them preparing my order, and it came out and was served to me within a reasonable amount of time. Everyone was friendly and accommodating.

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Quinoa Breakfast Bowl with Berries and Mint

The breakfast bowl was delicious and refreshing, and exactly what I needed on that day. The quinoa was warmed and the berries over the top were cold, and the juxtaposition of the two temperatures was very pleasant. The different textures of quinoa and berries, rounded together with the creamy almond butter and then a pop of flavor as the mint asserted its herbaceous zing, was also very, very pleasant. Very definitely, I found this to be a flavorful surprise.

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Fresh French Pressed Coffee

When my coffee was delivered to me, I was once again, pleasantly surprised. I was expecting a solo cup of coffee, which might have been sitting in a coffee urn for longer than I might imagine, but lo and behold, the server bought out a french press. She had poured me a cup of the fresh, hot coffee and added the coconut whip. Left in the french press, was enough coffee to pour another generous half cup, at least. I was very pleased. The coffee was fresh, hot and delicious.

I was glad I stopped in and broke up my day to finally try a place, I had often seen but hadn’t yet found the time to explore. I will definitely go back and I would wholeheartedly recommend anyone in the area, who is looking for a friendly and healthful place to enjoy a tasty breakfast, lunch or snack, give Roots Juice Bar a try!

Thank you for visiting me today, at Vegan Mami’s good food kitchen. Remember to feed yourself and your loved ones good whole foods that are tasty and attractive. And remember to take the time to treat yourself, and give yourself some rejuvenating time, so you can share more of yourself with those that matter to you the most!

Saturday Morning Market Finds

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Tiger Eye Dried Beans

 

Welcome back to Vegan Mami’s Good Food Kitchen! Saturday morning I enjoyed a shopping trip to my local Farmer’s Market. I’ve always enjoyed the atmosphere of the market filled with like-minded shoppers, who crowd in around the different tables and displays offered by the farmers and  venders. Customers are generously plied with samples and antidotes about items for sale. The venders are talkative and happy to answer any and all questions about their businesses. And there is a general sense of community among everyone, and a sense of relaxation and enjoyment, as people visit with one another sharing their hauls and munching on an appetizing treat or two, maybe accompanied by a steaming cup of coffee or tea. They also crowd around  and enjoy the audible art of the performers, who are more likely than not, local musicians.

Today I purchased potatoes,  dried beans and bok choy. The bok choy, which I purchased from Heron Pond Farm, from South Hampton N.H., was on the smallish side (baby bok choy), and its leaves were dark green and gloriously generous. I could just imagine seeing them swimming luxuriously in a brothy bowl of soup!

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Bok Choi

The dried beans, from The Root Seller located in Nottingham NH, were just lovely, and I was excited about trying them. I chose Tiger Eye, Flageolet, Jacob’s Cattle, Cranberry and Arikara Yellow. As soon as I returned home I set about soaking the tiger eye variety, to see how those cooked up and tasted.

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Bean Haul

 

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Tiger Eyes Soaking in Water

I boiled the Tiger Eye beans with 1/2 onion, one bay leaf and one smashed garlic clove and them cooked until tender. The beans were nice with a mild flavor and a texture similar to chickpeas (garbanzo beans). I cooked them a bit longer  to see if they would become creamy, but they still retained a small bite and seemed to begin breaking apart. Seems like they would be a versatile bean, working well in soups and stews and definitely standing on there own as a solo plate of beans. They would also puree well and make a nice bean dip or spread, in the same way chickpeas can be made into hummus.

I also purchased two five pound bags of potatoes from Riverside Farm Stand and Greenhouse  from Berwick Maine. I chose Yukon Gold Gem, and Rose Gold. I know from past experiences, my husband and I enjoy the Yukon Gold as an all purpose potato; using it for oven fries, mashed potatoes, in soups and stews, and baked potatoes. The Rose Gold, we had never tried before, and I thought it would be interesting to see what the difference could be.

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Spuds!

I cooked one potato of each kind in a saucepan filled with cold water, bought to the boil and then cooked over medium heat until the potatoes were tender. I cooked them this way, because I wanted them as unadorned as possible, even using no salt, to taste them just as they are with no condiments whatsoever. I wanted their individual flavors and textures to shine through.

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Potato Taste Test

The Yukon Gold Gem cooked up as I had expected, but it was not as gold as others we have had, and it seemed to share a bit of the floury texture of a russet potato. But it was definitely a waxy potato with very thin skin, which could easily be left on for cooking and eating.It was mildly sweet, with a rounded almost nutty, potato flavor.

And then came the Rose Gold! Wow! What a surprise! A waxy texture with no floury consistency whatsoever. The color was definitely a lovely rose gold hue, and the skin was also thin and suitable for leaving on the potato, if desired. The flavor was creamy and sweet and needed no embellishment at all. I imagined steaming them and having them with a salad; either cubed and tossed on top, or sliced and served on the side. I could imagine preparing these potatoes in any way imaginable and they would only improve the recipe. A new favorite, without a doubt!

All in all, it was a good, enjoyable trip to the Farmer’s Market. Even though it was not a good day for finding moneysaving values, I did find  items, that are local and of the highest quality as compared to what I would find in the chain grocery stores. My shopping haul total came to $31.80 cents. The dried beans were $5.00 a 1lb bag; I purchased 5 bags, which allowed me to get one bag free (special pricing from The Root Seller). The potatoes were $5.00 a 5lb bag, which is an average price for local  potatoes grown in the Seacoast area. The bok choy I chose came to $1.80 and I was very happy with that purchase.

Thank you for visiting Mami’s Good Food Kitchen today, and letting me share with you my market finds. Remember to feed yourself and your loved ones good, honest food. Eat as unprocessed as possible, as local as possible and always try new things!

Eat like it matters- because it really does!

Snow Fungus; The New Superfood?!!

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Welcome to Vegan Mamis Good Food Kitchen! Thank you for stopping by, today. I want to share with you a new item I found while shopping in my local Asian grocery store. It’s called Dried White Fungus. This is how I saw it in the store, on a shelf, nestled in its festive box:

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packaged dried white fungus

It looked like a gift, and I was intrigued. I could tell it was delicate because the package had been designed to guard the delicate little fungi from being crushed. I was drawn to it and decided it would be my next adventure into the culinary unknown.

Later, when I returned home and was able to do my research, I found  snow fungus goes by many names such as: snow fungus, white fungus, silver ear, white jelly mushroom and white wood ear. It’s latin name is Tremella Fuciformis, and it is a mycoparasite which means it isn’t cultivated on wood like oyster mushrooms, shiitake mushrooms and other mushrooms, but it feeds on the mushrooms that are cultivated on wood. (You can learn more about the mushroom world by going to TomVolkFungi.net).

The snow fungus has been used in chinese medicine for centuries and is credited as a beauty enhancer and digestive aid and possibly improving lung immune function. Now I am not a doctor, and I know nothing of these claims, but if you would like to see more information on this type of thing, you can find it at Ping Ming Health- Accupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine  http://www.pingminghealth.com/article/773/white-fungus-and-lung-immune-function

More benefit information is found at  http://www.herbmuseum.ca/content/medicinal-benefits-snow-fungus

But I am learning about this snow fungus because it heightened my curiosity, and I’m always happy to try new foods and discover how I can use them. To begin, I had to reconstitute the dried fungus in water, which involved soaking the yellowish fungus in water for about 2 hours. It grew into a good sized ball and turned a beautiful white color with a soft and yet firm consistency. Before I could cook the snow fungus I turned it over and trimmed off the hard yellowed bits that looked to be part of a stem.

I read quite a few recipes from the internet and they were all a bit different, but the simplest recipe was to boil the fungus with jujubes (which are chinese red dates) and a handful of goji berries, for approximately one hour , or until you feel it is done. This procedure is meant to create a bowl of soup served warm or cold that enhances beauty; and really, who could turn that down? When cooked, the fungus had a crunchy texture that was at the same time, soft and gelatinous. Cooking it made the water thicker and slippery, as though I had mixed an arrowroot slurry into the soup pot. The fungus had no taste. The interest about it was in the texture. I had noticed some recipes called for adding sugar, other recipes added fruits to cook with the fungus, such as peaches or apples to add flavor.

This was not a culinary treasure in the taste department, at least not these recipes, but if one was interested in the purported benefits of the snow fungus, than its not a bad way to get it down. I tried the soup hot and cold, and the texture of the soup hot, was interesting but when I tried it cold, the next day, it was hard to eat until I became used to the extra silky body of the broth and the gelatinous and crunchy texture of the fungus.

 

I was determined to try another recipe, to see if I could make it more enjoyable. This time I made it as part of a stew. In a large pot, I put the snow fungus, torn into pieces, tofu, zucchini, onions, leafy greens, carrots, sweet potato noodles, a couple large spoonfuls kimchi and one green chile pepper. Then I filled the pot with vegetable stock to cover the veggies, and added a spoonful of gochujang (Korean hot pepper paste). Bought everything to boil, and turned to low, covered with a lid and let it simmer for 35 to 40 minutes.

The flavor of the stew was good, and the snow fungus added its magic as it thickened the stew, ever so slightly, giving the stew juices a silky feel. The snow fungus stubbornly retained it’s soft chewy- yet crunchy texture. Although it added no taste, it added an interesting texture to the stew, and was not in the least disagreeable. So this recipe was a yes, and I could see myself making it again.

I have other recipe ideas to try with this beautiful little gem, but I will leave that for another time. I am sure I have not even begun to tap the possibilities. Thank you for visiting with me today, and remember to keep an open mind and try new things, and always

always

always,

feed yourself and your loved ones good foods, real foods, and foods that are as unprocessed as possible.

 

 

Potato and White Bean Cakes

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Potato and White Bean Cake with catsup and white kimchi

Welcome to Mami’s Good Food Kitchen! I will jump right into sharing this recipe in the spirit it was created. When I woke up this morning, I knew what I needed to do. It would be simple and quick with a minimum of fuss but a maximum of flavor. No added oils or sugars and no dairy products. Not a sweet recipe, but a savory recipe; suitable for breakfast or snack, or really any meal at all.

So, here it is!

Potato and White Bean Cake

  • Preheat oven to 425 F
  • Gather Ingredients:
  • 1/4 cup sundried tomatoes soaked in 1/2 cup hot water
  • 10 oz. cooked potato (1 medium and 1 small)
  • 3/4 cup cooked white beans, drained and rinsed (canned is fine)
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 small onion, minced
  • 2 Tbsp dried parsley
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp nutritional yeast
  • sprinkle of cayenne pepper (to add just a spark of heat)
  • 3 Tbsp of the sundried tomato soaking water
  • ground black pepper, to taste
  • salt to taste (if you cook no salt, then omit the salt)
  • panko crumbs or bread crumbs

Use cooked potatoes. If you have none on hand and want to cook them quickly, use the microwave and put them on the potato setting. If you don’t use a microwave, cut potatoes small and boil or steam until soft, while getting the rest of the ingredients together.

Then put 1/4 cup, no oil, sun dried tomatoes in a small bowl and pour 1/2 cup hot water over them to rehydrate. Let soak while you collect rest of ingredients.

In medium sized bowl, put 3/4 cup drained, white beans and mash gently with a fork, leaving most in their whole bean shape. Add to this the crushed garlic, minced onion, dried parsley, nutritional yeast, cayenne pepper, ground black pepper and salt, if you are using salt.

Drain sundried tomatoes, saving the liquid, and mince, or chop fine the reconstituted tomato, and add to the bowl. When the potatoes have cooled off enough to handle, mash them lightly and add the potatoes to the bowl. I left the skins on, to add extra fiber to the cakes.

Now mix all ingredients using your hands or a bean masher. A potato masher would work, too, but don’t mash too much, you still want texture, in your potato cake. Add the three tablespoons of the (saved) sundried tomato water and mix into potato bean mixture. You will be able to form mixture into patties. Make 5 or 6 patties, depending on the size you would like.

Once formed, you can pat panko bread crumbs on each side of the patty, and place on parchment paper sheet or silpat liner. I place this on top of my pizza stone which has been heating up with the oven. I find this helps me to crisp up the cakes and gives them a pleasing texture.

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4 cakes with 3 fun croquette shapes

Bake them in the oven, 425F for 15 minutes, turn them over and bake another 10 to 15 minutes, keeping watch not to burn, but cooking until golden brown and crispy.

These cakes could be pan fried if you wanted to use a non stick pan.

Use whatever condiment you enjoy and you will be rewarded with a tasty and satisfying base for any meal. I enjoyed them at breakfast with catsup and white kimchi, but I could easily see them being enjoyed covered  with a  tomato sauce and served with a salad, or as a snack with a no-cheese sauce for dipping!

Enjoy!

Remember to feed yourself and your loved ones good food, as unprocessed as possible. Eat like it matters; because it really does!

 

No-Cheese Cheezy Sauce

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No-cheese cheezy sauce turned into nacho cheeze sauce

Welcome  to Vegan Mami’s Good Food Kitchen. This past weekend my grandsons came over to visit, and what a fun visit it was! Both boys are growing so fast and always playing so hard! Along with growing and using up their energy stores they bought with them their ever increasing appetites. One of their very favorite meals is macaroni and cheese. You know the kind, the one that comes in a box and has a very creamy, rich sauce.

Because I don’t have boxes of mac-n-cheese in my pantry or cheese in my refrigerator to make it from scratch, I decided to try a no-cheese sauce for them and see if I could get them to eat it and hopefully enjoy it. The following is the recipe I like to use when I want to make a sauce that is easy to put together, cheezy, versatile and  is healthier than loading cheese and butter into a recipe.

No-Cheese Cheezy Sauce

  • 2 yukon gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 1″ chunks
  • 2 carrot, peeled and chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1 inch piece fresh turmeric, peeled. Or use powdered turmeric, 1/2 tsp.
  • 1 large onion, or 2 small, peeled and chopped into quarters

put all ingredients listed above into a medium saucepan and fill with water until all vegetables are covered. Put pan on burner over high heat until water begins to boil. Turn heat to medium and cook until veggies are fork tender.

With a slotted spoon, put all veggies in a blender, or food processor, with no more than 1/4 cup of cooking liquid. Add 2 Tablespoons nutritional yeast, and 1/2 tsp. ground yellow mustard. Carefully blend veggies until a smooth sauce develops. It will take about 30 to 45 seconds.

At this point you can add more of the cooking water if you think the sauce is too thick. Add salt and white pepper to your taste, and if you want a cheezier flavor, add more nutritional yeast, but only add in 1 tablespoon at a time and taste to see if the flavor is  where you want it. You should have approximately 3 cups.

To make macaroni and no-cheeze, cook your favorite pasta shape and put into a bowl, and spoon a bit of sauce over all and mix well. Very good, and very satisfying. Both boys enjoyed it and asked for seconds.

You can enjoy this sauce as a dip for your oven baked potatoes, and you will have a low fat and low sodium snack or side dish. Or you can ladle the sauce generously over a hot, steamed cauliflower sprinkled with bread crumbs, and enjoy a decadent dish!

Or, you can do as I did this afternoon, and bake your own corn chips by cutting corn tortillas into four wedges, baking them in a 425 degree oven for 12 to 15 minutes, until they become golden brown and toasty. Remove from oven and set on serving plate. Take some leftover No-cheese sauce and stir in some chili powder seasoning, cumin, smoked paprika and a couple shots of your favorite hot sauce, all to your taste. You can add tomato salsa or black olives or chopped green or red onions, depending on what you like and what you have on hand. Mix all together and warm the sauce in microwave or in a pan on the stove. and voila! Your have just made a healthier alternative to Tortilla chips and Nacho Cheese sauce!

Enjoy! Thank you for stopping by, I hope all your meals are tasty, nourishing and healthy  and your heart is filled with love.

Local Values at Local Grocery Stores

Good morning, and welcome to Vegan Mami’s  Good Food Kitchen. Sit down for a moment and enjoy a nice, warm comforting cup of tea. Today I’m having a nice little herbal from Celestial Seasonings, called Watermelon Lime Zinger. Very light; very refreshing; it’s a delicious little tea.

This morning as I was going through my mail, I noticed some really good prices in the circulars of the local grocery stores in the Seacoast NH Area. Right away, my attention perked up when I noticed sales on the produce pages of the circulars. I don’t usually bother with the rest of the circulars because I am only interested in whole foods or produce and other items that might be of value.

First, in the SHAW’s advertisements, I noticed

  • fresh  collard greens or kale,  .99 per bunch
  • Pricing good Dec. 9th thru Dec. 15

 

Second, in the Hannaford advertisements, I noticed

  • clementines, 5 lb box  $3.99
  • cauliflower head, $1.99 each
  • Hannaford brand light or dark kidney beans, 15.5oz can  .69 each
  • Hannaford brand frozen vegetables, all varieties, 16 oz    .99 bag
  • 25% off all selected holiday merchandise (excludes candy)
  • pricing good Dec. 11th thru Dec. 17

 

And lastly, in the Market Basket advertisements,

  • Roma Plum tomatoes  .99 lb
  • Idaho potatoes  1.99 per 5 lb bag
  • Eggplant  .99 lb
  • European Seedless cucumber  .89 each
  • Brussel Sprouts  $1.99 lb
  • Red Onions  .69 lb
  • Green Beans .99 lb
  • Zucchini squash .99 lb
  • Celery with leaves 1.29 bunch
  • Butternut Squash .49 lb
  • Yams .49 lb
  • Jumbo Stuffing Mushrooms 40 0z pkg, $6.99
  • Ginger Root, $1.49 lb
  • King Arthur Flour 5 lb bags, 2 bags for $4.oo
  • Pricing good Dec. 11th thru Dec. 24th

Easily I could see Market Basket was the clear winner in the store offering more discounts in the fresh produce section. So if you’d like to save a few pennies and need to stock up on your fresh veggies, I would definitely suggest you start off there.

Remember, the healthiest way to shop is by having a list and sticking with it as close as possible and keeping your pathway to the parameter of the store. The prepared foods containing chemicals, sodium and other unwanted and non-nutritive ingredients, are usually in the middle isles. Of course there are exceptions, such as dried beans, rices, pastas, oatmeal and some canned products; such as tomatoes or canned beans or jarred tomato sauce. Just read labels and make sure you know what you are getting, and that it’s something that you are willing to pay for, and is something you are choosing to feed your family or yourself. While it’s important to enjoy our food, it’s also important to remember food is necessary  to nourish our bodies and help keep us healthy. And being as healthy as we can be in this life is undeniably the best path to be on.

So thank you for dropping by and letting me share my information with you.At the very least, I hope this encourages and reminds you to look for ways to get more fresh produce into your life, and onto your table. And remember, be patient with yourself and your family as you try a vegetable that may be new and out of the ordinary from what you are used to; sometimes it takes more than a couple tries to know for sure if you and your loved ones will become accustomed to it.

Happy Shopping! Always remember to feed your body good foods, prepared well; and feed your soul happy and loving thoughts!

Kimchi and Veggie Soup with Carrot Zoodles

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figure friendly and tasty; kimchi and veggie soup with carrot zoodles

Welcome to Mami’s Good Food Kitchen, I hope you are keeping warm and happy during this cold and hectic time, while you are preparing for the holiday season. Have a seat and let me serve you a warm, spicy bowl of soup. It won’t add extra holiday pounds or leave you with the feeling of needing to work it off after the celebrations are over. It will fill your belly with a warm soothing glow, and you’ll feel lighter and more energized; maybe helping  you to feel ready to face another round of gift shopping, gift giving or celebrating.

This soup comes together quickly and simply. No need for simmering for hours on the stove top. What takes the longest is prepping the ingredients to add to the soup pot. One of the ingredients I used is braised king oyster mushroom, which was a leftover from a previous meal, but you could easily use any fresh mushroom you have on hand.

Let me walk you through how to put this together:

  1.  Put two cups water into a soup pot. Turn heat to medium-hi , to begin heating water. Spoon in 2 tsp of your favorite veggie-based powdered stock. I used mushroom powder. Mix together.
  2. Then add in ginger, garlic, onion, kimchi and mushrooms. Bring to boil and cook for 20 minutes.

 

3.  Now it’s time to add the zoodled carrots, bring quickly back to boil and cook for 2 minutes. Be careful not to overcook the carrots, you want them to be mostly firm and not soft.

4.  Add in the bok choy, tamari or soy sauce, and rice vinegar. Bring to boil, cook 3          minutes. Turn off heat and garnish with chopped scallions (or green onions). Ladle soup into bowl and if you use sesame oil, sprinkle just a few drops for added flavor and serve!

.List of Ingredients:

  • 2 cups water
  • 2 tsp veggie broth powder or Mushroom powder
  • 1 tsp shredded ginger
  • 2 sliced garlic cloves
  • 1/2 medium white onion, chopped
  • 1 cup kimchi (I used spicy), chopped, and use the juices accumulated while chopping.
  •  a handful of chopped mushrooms, fresh or braised ( I had braised 4 large king oyster mushrooms in a 350 degree oven in a water bath, flavored with soy sauce and garlic powder, for 45 minutes to use in another dish the night before. The one mushroom I had leftover I chopped up and added to this soup).
  • 1 large carrot, peeled and zoodled.
  • 2 heads baby bok choy, leaves cut in half lengthwise.
  • 2 tsp tamari or soy sauce
  • 1 tsp rice wine vinegar
  • chopped green onions, or scallions

Equipment Used:

Special equipment I used is this treasure of a clay pot that I found at a yard sale summers ago, for only .25, an amazing and wonderful find!

Also, I used a kitchen gadget called a spiralizer, which changes the texture of veggies and can either give them a noodle-like form or ribbon form. There are so many things you can do with this item, it amuses and amazes me. I got mine from Bed Bath and Beyond. The one I used, is from OXO Good Grips and retails for $39.99. But there are many manufactures that make the same thing, and in different configurations, with varying prices for all, and don’t forget store coupons, which I used. I actually  paid $20.99 for my spiralizer, which made me quite happy.

Thank you for visiting my kitchen today! I hope you enjoyed your soup and feel ready to get on with your busy day!

Remember to take care of yourself, feed yourself and your loved ones well, with healthy delicious foods, so we can look forward to enjoying many more crazy holiday seasons!

Easy Chickpea Frittata

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Chickpea Frittata with potato and onion

Today for lunch, we had a simple and filling meal. Chickpea frittata filled with caramelized onions and potatoes, served with hot sauce, and steamed broccoli. It was reminiscent of before we became plant-based, and I would make us my version of  Italian Frittata, or Spanish Tortilla, made rich and delicious with eggs and cheese.

I had heard of using Besan, or Chickpea flour as an egg substitute and although I didn’t expect it to taste just like eggs or have the same texture, I thought it would be at best, an interesting experiment.

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Chickpea flour and batter

Besan, ground chickpeas made into flour, is commonly used in Asian countries  such as India and Pakistan. It is a good source of Protein,  Potassium, Calcium, Iron, Vitamin B-6 and Magnesium. Because I believe in the whole-plant foods philosophy of eating, I would normally eat the chickpeas in there unground, whole form. But once in a while, you’ve got to answer that basic instinct that says “hey, I’d like some comfort food here, today!” And the rain was beating down on the roof, and the weather felt cold and showed no promise of letting up, so I thought today would be the perfect day to give this a try.

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Onions and Potatoes

I began by peeling and slicing one large yellow onion and two medium-sized potatoes. The onions were sauteed in water, to which I added a splash of white wine vinegar. I let them cook slowly in a non-stick pan while I  boiled the potatoes in a separate pot, stirring the onions occasionally to make sure they didn’t stick to the bottom of the pan. After they were cooked, I set them aside as I got the batter ready.

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Chickpea flour batter

Next I measured out one cup chickpea flour and poured it into a medium-sized bowl. In this bowl I also added:

  • 2 Tablespoons Nutritional Yeast
  • 1 tsp Black Salt
  • 1/2 tsp White Pepper
  • 1 1/2 tsp garlic powder

The black salt is used to flavor the batter as an egg, due to its eggy aroma. So, if you don’t have black salt, or don’t want to use salt, simply don’t put it in. Same with the pepper. If you prefer black pepper, or don’t want to use it, it’s optional. Put together the ingredients however it pleases you. Add 1 cup cold water, and whisk ingredients until well combined and there are no lumps. Set batter aside.

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Cooking in pan!

Heat a nonstick skillet. If you are cooking low or no fat, Just be warned that the frittata may stick a bit, but if you are skeptical of your pan, I would just put a dime-sized drizzle of whatever oil you like to use and spread it around the entire pan with a spatula. I was afraid at first the whole thing would stick in the pan, and I tried to turn the frittata too soon and it did look like it was going to stick in the skillet. I let it cook longer, and when I did invert it onto the cutting board, it hesitated for just a second or two until gravity coaxed it to let go of the skillet.

So, once heated, arrange the cooked potatoes in the pan first. Then layer the cooked onions on top of the potatoes. Than take your bowl of batter and pour that over the entire contents of the skillet. It may look to you that you should have more batter to cover the potatoes and onions generously, but I just barely had enough, and after it was done cooking, I realized it was the perfect amount of batter to hold everything together.

Cover the skillet with a lid, and let it cook slowly, on medium low for 12 to 15 minutes. Now comes the hardest part of all (and I didn’t get a picture because I don’t have enough arms to hold my camera and flip the tortilla). Uncover the skillet and remove from the burner. Take a wooden cutting board and place on top of the skillet. The board has to be big enough to hold the frittata. Using pot holders or kitchen towels, pick up the skillet by the handle with one hand, the other hand you will have on top of the cutting board. Flip quickly, so that you end up with the skillet on top and the cutting board on the bottom. Place the cutting board on the counter top right next to you. If you didn’t hear the thump of the frittata releasing, gently knock on the bottom of the skillet. You may need to knock a few times but you should hear it release onto the board.

Gently slide the frittata back into the skillet, and continue to cook on low, another 10 minutes, uncovered.

When 10 minutes are up, turn off the stove and put cutting board on top of skillet, again. Using the same technique as you used for the first flip over, flip the frittata onto the cutting board, but this time, take skillet away as soon as frittata is on the cutting board, cut as desired, either in squares or wedges, and serve.

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Finished Frittata

I served our frittata with steamed broccoli and hot sauce. It was very tasty and satisfying. It was comforting and although it wouldn’t fool anyone into thinking they were eating eggs and cheese, the frittata was very flavorful and nutritious and definitely something I would cook again. My husband also liked it, and was pleasantly surprised with the familiarity of it.

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Frittata with hot sauce

Thank you for visiting me at Vegan Mami’s Good Food Kitchen, where I like to serve food that nurtures the body and brings love to your heart. Take good care of yourself and your loved ones, remember to eat real foods in their whole forms, as often as possible. Your health depends on it!

Cha Cha Cha Chia Tea!

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Red Roobis Tea with Chia Seeds

Good morning everyone! This morning I started off the morning experimenting with hot beverages, once again. Even though the weather has been  scorching hot lately, I like to wake up and begin my day with a hot drink, and sometimes coffee just seems a bit too heavy.

Have you seen those drinks in the produce section, that cost three dollars (sometimes more) and they contain chia seeds?  The label says the chia seeds add omega threes and are very good for digestion?  Or have you ever had a bubble tea? Bubble teas are served hot or cold, can be made with teas or fruits and blended with your choice of milk. The really interesting thing with bubble teas is that it has sweetened tapioca balls added to the drink, which at first taste may seem strange if you are not used to it, but if you can appreciate the texture, it’s really a fun drink.

The tea I made this morning was inspired by these two different kinds of beverages. If you enjoy the chia drinks or the bubble tea, I think you would enjoy this too. I started by brewing a simple cup of hot tea. I used Better Off Red, by Now food products, a roobis red tea, which has no caffeine. After letting it steep about 4 minutes, I added just a touch of soy milk creamer which I had purchased at Trader Joe’s grocery store. Then I added approximately 2 tsp. of chia seeds directly to the tea and stirred, untill blended. As the chia seeds absorbed the hot tea, they became as chia seeds do, slightly bigger and viscous (dare I say, slimey?) When the tea had cooled enough to sip, it was pleasant to drink, and nice to have with my unbuttered whole wheat toast and nectarine, as it helped to add an element of interest to an otherwise neutral breakfast. Although, I do have to comment that the nectarine was divine, mother nature at her best!.

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Chia seeds in my Tea !?!

Thank you for visiting Vegan Mami’s Good Food Kitchen!

Have a blessed day, and remember to feed yourself and your loved ones Good Food!

Tumeric Latte- Caffeine Free and full of Tumeric Goodness!

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Tumeric Latte

Good monday morning to everyone, and welcome to Mami’s Good Food Kitchen! Ever hear of the health benefits of tumeric? I think we all have; just google tumeric and you will find a plethora of information on why its good to include in our diets. One can take a supplement, or use turmeric in powder form, or use it fresh. I believe the best way to use tumeric is to use it fresh. You can buy it in its whole form and it can usually be found in a grocery store, in the Asian or Indian produce section, if you have a store in your area that has those kinds of groceries. If fresh tumeric can’t be found, than powdered is the next best option.

My husband is wanting to give up caffeine, and his morning cup of coffee is the hardest thing for him to give up. Choosing caffeine free coffee is the first obvious route to take, but he didn’t like the taste and just wasn’t happy no matter what brand we tried. He had also heard about the health benefits of tumeric and felt he wanted to try it and see if it gave him positive benefits. Sometimes, when trying to make a drastic change in the diet, such as cutting out something that’s not benefiting you (such as caffeine) the easiest and best way is to totally avoid the item you are trying to eliminate and replace it with something else. I had heard of tumeric milk, a drink made by Indian mothers to give to their loved ones who maybe had a cold or were feeling under the weather, and thought I would research to see if it made sense to make something like that to substitute for my husband’s morning coffee.

After looking at the many recipes I found, I came up with a latte drink, served warm, that just might do the trick. It’s a Tumeric Latte – and this is how I made it:

  • 1  1/2 cups plant based milk (so far I used almond and soy- both came out great)
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 thumbsized piece of tumeric, skin scraped off and minced
  • 1/4 ” slice of ginger, skin scraped off and minced
  • 1 tsp ground cardamon, 1 /4 tsp powdered nutmeg, sprinkle of cinnamon

In a saucepan, I added the water and the plant based milk. Turned the heat on to medium. while that was heating up I added in the minced tumeric  and  ginger , and the powdered nutmeg and cardamon. when the mixture just comes to a boil, I turned the heat off and with my stick blender, blend the milk mixture for a few minutes, until the mixture is frothy and well combined. You will still get small pieces of pulp in the drink, which can be strained out before being poured in a cup, but I think you will benefit more from the entire tumeric and ginger, but its a personal preference.

with a ladle, place Latte in a cup and sprinkle with powdered cinnamon.  And then, Enjoy!

This recipe makes two cups latte, and can easily be saved and reheated if you serve only one cup.

My husband did enjoy the latte, and is looking forward to having it again. It made it easier for him to give up that morning cup of joe, maybe because he was distracted by the new tastes in a different, but still warm drink? I don’t know. As for the benefits, well, we will have to wait and see…

But for now, he is happy, and that’s what Mami’s Good Food Kitchen is all about!

Thank you for visiting, and may you have a day that is full of blessings and love.