Saturday Morning Market Finds

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Tiger Eye Dried Beans

 

Welcome back to Vegan Mami’s Good Food Kitchen! Saturday morning I enjoyed a shopping trip to my local Farmer’s Market. I’ve always enjoyed the atmosphere of the market filled with like-minded shoppers, who crowd in around the different tables and displays offered by the farmers and  venders. Customers are generously plied with samples and antidotes about items for sale. The venders are talkative and happy to answer any and all questions about their businesses. And there is a general sense of community among everyone, and a sense of relaxation and enjoyment, as people visit with one another sharing their hauls and munching on an appetizing treat or two, maybe accompanied by a steaming cup of coffee or tea. They also crowd around  and enjoy the audible art of the performers, who are more likely than not, local musicians.

Today I purchased potatoes,  dried beans and bok choy. The bok choy, which I purchased from Heron Pond Farm, from South Hampton N.H., was on the smallish side (baby bok choy), and its leaves were dark green and gloriously generous. I could just imagine seeing them swimming luxuriously in a brothy bowl of soup!

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Bok Choi

The dried beans, from The Root Seller located in Nottingham NH, were just lovely, and I was excited about trying them. I chose Tiger Eye, Flageolet, Jacob’s Cattle, Cranberry and Arikara Yellow. As soon as I returned home I set about soaking the tiger eye variety, to see how those cooked up and tasted.

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Bean Haul

 

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Tiger Eyes Soaking in Water

I boiled the Tiger Eye beans with 1/2 onion, one bay leaf and one smashed garlic clove and them cooked until tender. The beans were nice with a mild flavor and a texture similar to chickpeas (garbanzo beans). I cooked them a bit longer  to see if they would become creamy, but they still retained a small bite and seemed to begin breaking apart. Seems like they would be a versatile bean, working well in soups and stews and definitely standing on there own as a solo plate of beans. They would also puree well and make a nice bean dip or spread, in the same way chickpeas can be made into hummus.

I also purchased two five pound bags of potatoes from Riverside Farm Stand and Greenhouse  from Berwick Maine. I chose Yukon Gold Gem, and Rose Gold. I know from past experiences, my husband and I enjoy the Yukon Gold as an all purpose potato; using it for oven fries, mashed potatoes, in soups and stews, and baked potatoes. The Rose Gold, we had never tried before, and I thought it would be interesting to see what the difference could be.

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Spuds!

I cooked one potato of each kind in a saucepan filled with cold water, bought to the boil and then cooked over medium heat until the potatoes were tender. I cooked them this way, because I wanted them as unadorned as possible, even using no salt, to taste them just as they are with no condiments whatsoever. I wanted their individual flavors and textures to shine through.

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Potato Taste Test

The Yukon Gold Gem cooked up as I had expected, but it was not as gold as others we have had, and it seemed to share a bit of the floury texture of a russet potato. But it was definitely a waxy potato with very thin skin, which could easily be left on for cooking and eating.It was mildly sweet, with a rounded almost nutty, potato flavor.

And then came the Rose Gold! Wow! What a surprise! A waxy texture with no floury consistency whatsoever. The color was definitely a lovely rose gold hue, and the skin was also thin and suitable for leaving on the potato, if desired. The flavor was creamy and sweet and needed no embellishment at all. I imagined steaming them and having them with a salad; either cubed and tossed on top, or sliced and served on the side. I could imagine preparing these potatoes in any way imaginable and they would only improve the recipe. A new favorite, without a doubt!

All in all, it was a good, enjoyable trip to the Farmer’s Market. Even though it was not a good day for finding moneysaving values, I did find  items, that are local and of the highest quality as compared to what I would find in the chain grocery stores. My shopping haul total came to $31.80 cents. The dried beans were $5.00 a 1lb bag; I purchased 5 bags, which allowed me to get one bag free (special pricing from The Root Seller). The potatoes were $5.00 a 5lb bag, which is an average price for local  potatoes grown in the Seacoast area. The bok choy I chose came to $1.80 and I was very happy with that purchase.

Thank you for visiting Mami’s Good Food Kitchen today, and letting me share with you my market finds. Remember to feed yourself and your loved ones good, honest food. Eat as unprocessed as possible, as local as possible and always try new things!

Eat like it matters- because it really does!

Snow Fungus; The New Superfood?!!

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Welcome to Vegan Mamis Good Food Kitchen! Thank you for stopping by, today. I want to share with you a new item I found while shopping in my local Asian grocery store. It’s called Dried White Fungus. This is how I saw it in the store, on a shelf, nestled in its festive box:

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packaged dried white fungus

It looked like a gift, and I was intrigued. I could tell it was delicate because the package had been designed to guard the delicate little fungi from being crushed. I was drawn to it and decided it would be my next adventure into the culinary unknown.

Later, when I returned home and was able to do my research, I found  snow fungus goes by many names such as: snow fungus, white fungus, silver ear, white jelly mushroom and white wood ear. It’s latin name is Tremella Fuciformis, and it is a mycoparasite which means it isn’t cultivated on wood like oyster mushrooms, shiitake mushrooms and other mushrooms, but it feeds on the mushrooms that are cultivated on wood. (You can learn more about the mushroom world by going to TomVolkFungi.net).

The snow fungus has been used in chinese medicine for centuries and is credited as a beauty enhancer and digestive aid and possibly improving lung immune function. Now I am not a doctor, and I know nothing of these claims, but if you would like to see more information on this type of thing, you can find it at Ping Ming Health- Accupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine  http://www.pingminghealth.com/article/773/white-fungus-and-lung-immune-function

More benefit information is found at  http://www.herbmuseum.ca/content/medicinal-benefits-snow-fungus

But I am learning about this snow fungus because it heightened my curiosity, and I’m always happy to try new foods and discover how I can use them. To begin, I had to reconstitute the dried fungus in water, which involved soaking the yellowish fungus in water for about 2 hours. It grew into a good sized ball and turned a beautiful white color with a soft and yet firm consistency. Before I could cook the snow fungus I turned it over and trimmed off the hard yellowed bits that looked to be part of a stem.

I read quite a few recipes from the internet and they were all a bit different, but the simplest recipe was to boil the fungus with jujubes (which are chinese red dates) and a handful of goji berries, for approximately one hour , or until you feel it is done. This procedure is meant to create a bowl of soup served warm or cold that enhances beauty; and really, who could turn that down? When cooked, the fungus had a crunchy texture that was at the same time, soft and gelatinous. Cooking it made the water thicker and slippery, as though I had mixed an arrowroot slurry into the soup pot. The fungus had no taste. The interest about it was in the texture. I had noticed some recipes called for adding sugar, other recipes added fruits to cook with the fungus, such as peaches or apples to add flavor.

This was not a culinary treasure in the taste department, at least not these recipes, but if one was interested in the purported benefits of the snow fungus, than its not a bad way to get it down. I tried the soup hot and cold, and the texture of the soup hot, was interesting but when I tried it cold, the next day, it was hard to eat until I became used to the extra silky body of the broth and the gelatinous and crunchy texture of the fungus.

 

I was determined to try another recipe, to see if I could make it more enjoyable. This time I made it as part of a stew. In a large pot, I put the snow fungus, torn into pieces, tofu, zucchini, onions, leafy greens, carrots, sweet potato noodles, a couple large spoonfuls kimchi and one green chile pepper. Then I filled the pot with vegetable stock to cover the veggies, and added a spoonful of gochujang (Korean hot pepper paste). Bought everything to boil, and turned to low, covered with a lid and let it simmer for 35 to 40 minutes.

The flavor of the stew was good, and the snow fungus added its magic as it thickened the stew, ever so slightly, giving the stew juices a silky feel. The snow fungus stubbornly retained it’s soft chewy- yet crunchy texture. Although it added no taste, it added an interesting texture to the stew, and was not in the least disagreeable. So this recipe was a yes, and I could see myself making it again.

I have other recipe ideas to try with this beautiful little gem, but I will leave that for another time. I am sure I have not even begun to tap the possibilities. Thank you for visiting with me today, and remember to keep an open mind and try new things, and always

always

always,

feed yourself and your loved ones good foods, real foods, and foods that are as unprocessed as possible.

 

 

Potato and White Bean Cakes

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Potato and White Bean Cake with catsup and white kimchi

Welcome to Mami’s Good Food Kitchen! I will jump right into sharing this recipe in the spirit it was created. When I woke up this morning, I knew what I needed to do. It would be simple and quick with a minimum of fuss but a maximum of flavor. No added oils or sugars and no dairy products. Not a sweet recipe, but a savory recipe; suitable for breakfast or snack, or really any meal at all.

So, here it is!

Potato and White Bean Cake

  • Preheat oven to 425 F
  • Gather Ingredients:
  • 1/4 cup sundried tomatoes soaked in 1/2 cup hot water
  • 10 oz. cooked potato (1 medium and 1 small)
  • 3/4 cup cooked white beans, drained and rinsed (canned is fine)
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 small onion, minced
  • 2 Tbsp dried parsley
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp nutritional yeast
  • sprinkle of cayenne pepper (to add just a spark of heat)
  • 3 Tbsp of the sundried tomato soaking water
  • ground black pepper, to taste
  • salt to taste (if you cook no salt, then omit the salt)
  • panko crumbs or bread crumbs

Use cooked potatoes. If you have none on hand and want to cook them quickly, use the microwave and put them on the potato setting. If you don’t use a microwave, cut potatoes small and boil or steam until soft, while getting the rest of the ingredients together.

Then put 1/4 cup, no oil, sun dried tomatoes in a small bowl and pour 1/2 cup hot water over them to rehydrate. Let soak while you collect rest of ingredients.

In medium sized bowl, put 3/4 cup drained, white beans and mash gently with a fork, leaving most in their whole bean shape. Add to this the crushed garlic, minced onion, dried parsley, nutritional yeast, cayenne pepper, ground black pepper and salt, if you are using salt.

Drain sundried tomatoes, saving the liquid, and mince, or chop fine the reconstituted tomato, and add to the bowl. When the potatoes have cooled off enough to handle, mash them lightly and add the potatoes to the bowl. I left the skins on, to add extra fiber to the cakes.

Now mix all ingredients using your hands or a bean masher. A potato masher would work, too, but don’t mash too much, you still want texture, in your potato cake. Add the three tablespoons of the (saved) sundried tomato water and mix into potato bean mixture. You will be able to form mixture into patties. Make 5 or 6 patties, depending on the size you would like.

Once formed, you can pat panko bread crumbs on each side of the patty, and place on parchment paper sheet or silpat liner. I place this on top of my pizza stone which has been heating up with the oven. I find this helps me to crisp up the cakes and gives them a pleasing texture.

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4 cakes with 3 fun croquette shapes

Bake them in the oven, 425F for 15 minutes, turn them over and bake another 10 to 15 minutes, keeping watch not to burn, but cooking until golden brown and crispy.

These cakes could be pan fried if you wanted to use a non stick pan.

Use whatever condiment you enjoy and you will be rewarded with a tasty and satisfying base for any meal. I enjoyed them at breakfast with catsup and white kimchi, but I could easily see them being enjoyed covered  with a  tomato sauce and served with a salad, or as a snack with a no-cheese sauce for dipping!

Enjoy!

Remember to feed yourself and your loved ones good food, as unprocessed as possible. Eat like it matters; because it really does!

 

Magic Mushroom Powder

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Mushroom Wakame Powder

Thank you for stopping by Mami’s Good Food Kitchen, today I will share with you a magic seasoning powder I make that lends an umami flavor to some of my dishes.It’s quick and simple, and can be mixed with any other seasoning you enjoy to give it your own spin.

You will need:

  • a blender (I use a vitamix, others will work but may take longer)
  • 4 cups dried mushrooms, wiped clean  (a mix or just shiitake)
  • 1/4 cup shredded wakame seaweed
  • recycled jar to store powder in

After wiping the dried mushrooms clean, put them and the wakame in the blender. Cover the blender and use tamper to help push the mushrooms and wakame down to help them blend better and uniformly. Blend on high until mixture becomes a soft, dry, silky powder.

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mushroom and wakame powder

If you want to add any other spices or salt, you should add them before you blend everything, to ensure the same texture throughout. You could add  dried thyme, or granulated garlic or onion powder, or even dried rosemary, depending on your taste and how you intend to use the powder. I  blend only the mushroom and wakame because I season dishes differently depending on what I am making and  I like the freedom of choosing various seasonings.

A teaspoon or two in a soup will add a depth of flavor; or put some in the rice pot,while cooking  rice, or in the bean cooking liquid. If you are making seitan, a couple spoonfuls mixed in with the vital wheat gluten will add a nice umami flavor to your faux meat.

Store in a recycled, cleaned jar, in a cool dark place or wherever  you keep your other powders and spices. Kept dry, it should last indefinitely.

Till next time, take care and remember to serve your loved ones good, tasty  foods, made with love and care.

What, No Turkey!?!

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Roasted Pumpkin with Stuffing

Welcome to Mami’s Good Food Kitchen!Pull up a chair and have a cup of tea, while we have a little chat.

Thanksgiving is coming up and I’m sure you’ve seen all the advertisements suggesting you order your turkey early, or the advertisements telling you of the best places to go to get the best prices on your Thanksgiving centerpiece. Or maybe you’ve endured the countless requests to donate turkeys, or money for turkeys for people who are having trouble making ends meet or even putting food on the table. All presented with the unspoken and underlying belief that Thanksgiving is all about the Turkey. And it has been all about the turkey, since the first pilgrims celebrated the Harvest Festival in 1621. Or should I say, it has become all about the Turkey. People stress themselves out looking for the perfect turkey to cook in their oven in the most perfect way. Buying such a huge bird that it could easily feed many more than  actually expected for dinner. I know, I know, it’s about the leftovers.

Maybe its because I’ve always been such a rebel. Always fighting against tradition or always fighting against what I’m expected or supposed to do. Or maybe its because I think outside of the box, but in anycase, I’m going to share with you what is important for me on Thanksgiving and why I say,”forget the turkey- It’s still Thanksgiving!”

Let the turkey live! I choose not to eat animals because I believe the animal protein is harder for my body to digest, and I believe as long as there are other means to get our protein, we shouldn’t be needing to kill animals to be healthy and fed. So, what does Thanksgiving mean to me? It is a festival or celebration about life and the abundance in our lives. A time to come together with others with love and gratefulness. It’s about being kind and counting our many blessings. A time for examining the past year and remembering and cherishing memories made this year and in years past. And Thanksgiving is about sharing. Sharing with those in need and sharing with those we love. Sharing things we are all grateful for, and for sharing a meal that nourishes our souls and bodies and celebrates our abundance.

For my centerpiece this year, I will have a roasted pumpkin filled with stuffing. Slow roasted and toasty with the crunchy part of the stuffing some people love to munch on and the soft stuffing which has cooked into a savory soft bread pudding texture inside of the pumpkin. The bonus is the pumpkin flesh that becomes soft and melty and compliments the stuffing and the flavor of the Bell’s Stuffing Seasoning.

To begin, I prepare my ingredients.

  • 1 carrot, chopped fine
  • 3 baby onions, white and green parts, chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped
  • 1/4 cup golden raisins (or black raisins, or cranberries)
  • 1/4 cup chopped walnuts

Now it’s time to cut open and clean out that pumpkin! You can do it!

Now for the rest of the ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 tsp Bell’s Seasoning (mixture of Rosemary, oregano, sage, ginger, marjoram)
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp thyme
  • 1/2 tsp white pepper
  • 3 cups of dried cubed stuffing (could make your own if you don’t want packaged)

and for the stock:

  • 2 1/2 Tbsp  no-chicken stock powder
  • 2 Tbsp Earth Balance (can be omitted if following a no fat diet)
  • 2 cups water

Next step is to water saute the onions, carrots and celery. When they have softened, you can add in the seasonings (Bell’s Seasoning, thyme, garlic powder and white pepper). While you are sauteing the veggies, put 2 cups water into small saucepan and place on stove. Turn to high and heat water, when it reaches a boil, whisk in the non-chicken stock powder, and the Earth Balance, if you are using it.

The next step is to add the bread crumbs to the saute pan with the veggies and seasoning. Stir until all is combined. Then take the saucepan holding the stock mixture and pour about 3/4 of stock mixture into bread cube mixture. Mix all together and add more stock if you like your stuffing moister.20161111_164022

And finally, you can spoon the stuffing into the emptied pumpkin, filling it all the way, and even mounding it, to ensure the crunchy bits that will form on the top. Also wrap the lid in aluminum foil, so it doesn’t burn while the rest of the pumpkin is baking. Any leftover stuffing you can spoon into a loaf pan (I used a glass one here), and bake it with the pumpkin, spreading it thin if you like it crunchy, or putting it in a smaller ovenproof container if you want it softer.

Bake in a preheated oven, 375 degrees fahrenheit, for approximately 50 to 60 minutes. Keep checking in the oven when you reach 50 minutes, the pumpkin will tell you when it’s done, it will be soft when poked with a fork, and the stuffing should look crunchy and browned, but not too dark…20161111_20155820161111_180436

Maybe mine came out a little too brown. I’ll remember, next time.

But it was good. Very good. I served it with mashed potatoes and gravy, and a big, green salad. I could imagine for Thanksgiving dinner, I would add more of the usual fixings, like green beans, or broccoli or cranberry sauce…you can add whatever else you would like on your menu.

Another change one could make, would be to change the squash out. The Pumpkin was good, but Buttercup Squash or Red Kuri Squash, or Kabocha, which are all squashes in the Hubbard Squash family,  would also work very well in this recipe for taste and for appearance. They are also pretty winter squashes and their taste is deeper and sweeter, with a silky texture. I always like to say, recipes are not rules, but merely guidelines and you should make things the way you know you will like them.

Thank you for visiting me today, at Vegan Mamis Good Food Kitchen. I hope you enjoyed today’s recipe and our talk about what Thanksgiving means to me. Let me know what you are Thankful for this year, and how you will celebrate this beautiful holiday. Take care and remember to feed yourself and your loved ones real food, good food, made with love, to keep everyone healthy and fed!

?????? Zukes!

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Zuchini curls

Welcome to this quick peek into my Good Foods Kitchen!

It’s that time of year again! I’ve just put together a zuchini lasagna. I made the mozzarella from nuts and used thinly sliced zuchini mixed in with a couple lasagna pasta noodles. I’m putting it in the refrigerator to wait for morning, when the weather is cooler and I can turn the oven on without overheating the entire house. If the lasagne comes out good, I will follow with a recipe. If it doesn’t come out good…I’ll work on it and still come out with the recipe.

Meanwhile, I had one zuchini left, which I felt inspired to cut into thin strips with a peeler. Hmmmmm. What shall I do with it now?

Thank you for visiting, and have a blessed evening, filled with good food and love!

Tumeric Latte- Caffeine Free and full of Tumeric Goodness!

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Tumeric Latte

Good monday morning to everyone, and welcome to Mami’s Good Food Kitchen! Ever hear of the health benefits of tumeric? I think we all have; just google tumeric and you will find a plethora of information on why its good to include in our diets. One can take a supplement, or use turmeric in powder form, or use it fresh. I believe the best way to use tumeric is to use it fresh. You can buy it in its whole form and it can usually be found in a grocery store, in the Asian or Indian produce section, if you have a store in your area that has those kinds of groceries. If fresh tumeric can’t be found, than powdered is the next best option.

My husband is wanting to give up caffeine, and his morning cup of coffee is the hardest thing for him to give up. Choosing caffeine free coffee is the first obvious route to take, but he didn’t like the taste and just wasn’t happy no matter what brand we tried. He had also heard about the health benefits of tumeric and felt he wanted to try it and see if it gave him positive benefits. Sometimes, when trying to make a drastic change in the diet, such as cutting out something that’s not benefiting you (such as caffeine) the easiest and best way is to totally avoid the item you are trying to eliminate and replace it with something else. I had heard of tumeric milk, a drink made by Indian mothers to give to their loved ones who maybe had a cold or were feeling under the weather, and thought I would research to see if it made sense to make something like that to substitute for my husband’s morning coffee.

After looking at the many recipes I found, I came up with a latte drink, served warm, that just might do the trick. It’s a Tumeric Latte – and this is how I made it:

  • 1  1/2 cups plant based milk (so far I used almond and soy- both came out great)
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 thumbsized piece of tumeric, skin scraped off and minced
  • 1/4 ” slice of ginger, skin scraped off and minced
  • 1 tsp ground cardamon, 1 /4 tsp powdered nutmeg, sprinkle of cinnamon

In a saucepan, I added the water and the plant based milk. Turned the heat on to medium. while that was heating up I added in the minced tumeric  and  ginger , and the powdered nutmeg and cardamon. when the mixture just comes to a boil, I turned the heat off and with my stick blender, blend the milk mixture for a few minutes, until the mixture is frothy and well combined. You will still get small pieces of pulp in the drink, which can be strained out before being poured in a cup, but I think you will benefit more from the entire tumeric and ginger, but its a personal preference.

with a ladle, place Latte in a cup and sprinkle with powdered cinnamon.  And then, Enjoy!

This recipe makes two cups latte, and can easily be saved and reheated if you serve only one cup.

My husband did enjoy the latte, and is looking forward to having it again. It made it easier for him to give up that morning cup of joe, maybe because he was distracted by the new tastes in a different, but still warm drink? I don’t know. As for the benefits, well, we will have to wait and see…

But for now, he is happy, and that’s what Mami’s Good Food Kitchen is all about!

Thank you for visiting, and may you have a day that is full of blessings and love.

Supper Tonight at Mami’s

Welcome to Mami’s Good Food Kitchen! Pull up a chair, bring along  your adventurous taste buds and try a dish with a flavor profile that pops you out of your same old, same old meal prep and transports you to a place you may not have expected in your own kitchen.

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Based on Koshari

This recipe is based loosely on a Egyptian recipe called Koshari. I came across it as I was checking out Mommy Tang’s YouTube channel, where she does mukbangs and vegan recipes. She had, as her guest, a young lady named Marion, who shared with everyone her version of Koshari, as taught to her by her father, I believe.

The recipe caught my attention right away, as the spices were different than other spices and flavors I had used, and also seemed perfect to serve as a vegan meal because it looks nourishing and filling and oddly familiar. Even though there seemed to be a lot of prep, it looked as though it would go together easily, once all the components were assembled.  It looked easy to make into a whole foods meal and looked forgiving enough to stand up to omissions or changes one might wish to make. For example, I used a mix of three lentils, whole wheat pasta and brown rice. Came out very delicious!

So the main idea is to use pasta, rice, and lentils. Which are all cooked separately and then served in a dish with a tomato sauce on top to be mixed in before eating, as I’ve pictured above. Although, as I researched on-line for recipes, I noted some directions instructed  to cook the lentils and rice together. I am always concerned  if my rice and lentils will be done at the same time, so I prefer to cook them separately just to be sure.

I cooked the rice and lentils separately, but used the same spices for both. and I used a dry roasting method – or dry frying- toasting the spices in the dry pan before adding the rice or lentils and the cooking water. I used garlic, ground coriander, ground cumin, ground cardamon, salt and pepper.In the rice I also put a stick of cinnamon, which would come out after the rice was cooked. For the rice, I used 1 cup rice to 2 cups water and for cooking the lentils I used the same measurement. The rice cooked for 35 minutes at low, and covered, after coming to a boil. The lentils I cooked uncovered and they took about 25 minutes to cook, but I kept checking the lentils to make sure they were not overcooking. At the same time, I cooked the pasta. I used whole wheat pasta shaped as  corkscrews, and followed the package directions. When all three were done, I lined them up on hot plate trivets on my counter in covered pots. Oh Yes, the lentils and the pasta were drained of  their cooking water so they wouldn’t get soggy, as they waited for me to pull  all the components  together.

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Plated and ready for dinner! just add a salad!

As I was cooking the rice, pasta and lentils, I also made the tomato sauce to top the dish. It too, was simple and went together really fast.

I used one 12 0z can of crushed tomatoes and put it in a saucepan. to that I added 1/2 can of water, 3 crushed garlic cloves, salt and pepper and one tbsp of vinegar. Brought to a boil, covered and let simmer for at least 25 minutes, while everything else was cooking.

To serve the dish, layer all ingredients on a plate beginning with the whole wheat pasta, then the aromatic rice, and finally a layer of lentils. Top  with tomato sauce,using however much you like. Finally serve the dish with a side of salad to complete the meal.  I chose a green salad with romaine lettuce, tomato, red onion and cucumber. Very simple, but a good and pleasing side dish.

Even though there were a lot of steps to pulling this meal together, it was very tasty and simple. Filled me up fast- one serving was quite enough and it kept me feeling full for quite a while.

Thank you for visiting Mami’s  Good Food Kitchen and may all your meals be nourishing and delicious and full of love!20160705_204205

Sunday Breakfast with Mami

Happy Sunday morning to everyone! Hopefully you can ease into the day and share time with loved ones and on projects or adventures you find fulfilling and joyful. If you do not have the day to yourself (if you have to work), I still wish you a happy Sunday, and I thank you for providing a valuable service on this day, and hope you find fulfilment and joy in your day as well.

Today, at Mami’s household, we are having a slow start; sipping on coffee and waking up slowly. The weather of the day is lending an even slower-motion feeling. Not sunny, a little chilly, and somehow a  quiet theme is playing itself out .

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It’s What for Breakfast!

So, here’s breakfast because not quite feeling like oatmeal or other cereals, not quite in the mood for toast or fruits, and definitely not in the mood for pancakes. But definitely hungry. So I made tofu scramble with the usual scramble veggies, which are mushrooms, onions, red peppers, and seasoned this mixture with tumeric, Berbere Seasoning from Frontier Natural Products.

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Berbere Seasoning

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After the tofu scramble was cooked and seasoned,  I arranged the scramble and polenta in a bowl and decorated with leftover elements from last night’s supper of veggie tacos. A spoon ful of blackbeans, few chunks of chopped tomato, approximately 1/8th of an avacado, and then sprinkled the food in the bowl with chopped cilantro, scallions and nutritional yeast…oh yes, and my favorite,  non-calorie condiment, lime juice. Very good, very filling and looks pretty nutritious!

And now, onto the rest of the day!

Thank you for sharing your time with me.

Take good care of yourself and your loved ones and remember to cook and serve good food!

 

 

Green Smoothy… Just Plants

So, my husband had fallen off the healthy eating track during the holidays and was beginning to feel bloated and heavy; losing the vitality and energy he had found while eating a lighter, cleaner and plant-based diet. He wanted to get back on track, and he usually does that by juicing for about a week, but he was feeling too lazy to drag out the juicer. I didn’t want to buy all kinds of juicing veggies only to have them wilt away and go bad in the refrigerator. And though I think juicing is fine for some, I like the idea of making a smoothy and enjoying the nutrition of the veggies/fruits as well as keeping the benefits of the fiber, which our bodies also need. So we comprised.

I washed and cut up an assortment of fruits and veggies, to blend in my Vitamix, and made him a smoothy drink he could consume  at lunch time and any other time of the day he wanted a veggie pick-me-up.20160104_073323 Baby bok choy, carrots, celery, spinach, romaine lettuce, cucumbers, oranges, pineapple and hemp seed hearts. I added about 2 cups Exeter spring water and then blended until all ingredients were liquified. My work station looked like this: 2016-01-07 12.45.50

Once all ingredients were liquified, I poured them into glass containers, plus a special tasting glass for the chef!20160104_081314All in all, the smoothy tasted pretty good. It did admittedly taste green, but once you become familar with the “green”taste,  I think it was pretty good. Next time I would definitely add some ginger and lime or lemon, for a little kick.

After tasting his smoothy, my husband thought it was a bit sour…or needed sweetness. His tastebuds had quickly reverted back to his desire for sugar during his holiday feasting. So, I had to add two more oranges, a carrot and 4 pitted dates to the mix; reblended and let him taste again. This time it tasted better for him, and he was set to begin his day with getting back to healthier eating.

I took a bottle of smoothy  to work with me for lunch, just in case I didn’t get to stop and eat my packed lunch, and I was surprised at how full and satisfied I felt, and it kept me going until supper. I would definitely suggest anyone else do the same, but tailor it to veggies and fruits that are personal favorites and be mindful to add a variety of colors…not just greens and even taste as you go along. I have at times added a handful of dry old-fashioned oats and a tablespoon of hemp seed hearts  or almonds to add some heartiness and protein. Besides the obvious nutritional benefits, the thing I like best about this smoothy is no added chemicals or thickeners or preservatives…just plain  good food!!